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The Role of Production in Jewelry Marketing

Episode #278 – “The Role of Production in Jewelry Marketing”

Welcome to Episode #278. Today, I’d like to discuss a common challenge many jewelry business owners face when it comes to planning their marketing content. Surprisingly, it’s not about their marketing skills or knowledge, but rather about production; yes, about the actual designing and making of their products.

When we help our clients organize their content calendars, typically looking six months ahead, we sometimes hit a roadblock: not knowing the production schedule. Together, between us and the business owner, we have no shortage of good and interesting ideas. But if the production calendar hasn’t been fleshed out, we can’t plan marketing effectively.

I understand that production can be complicated, especially if you’re not making everything yourself. Even if you are, relying on suppliers and delivery times can be tricky. But even business owners who handle everything sometimes struggle to plan ahead because they prioritize creativity over sticking to a schedule.

While being creative is amazing and important, it’s important to realize that running a solid business powered by effective marketing needs some insight into production. Without it, planning can really become chaotic, which isn’t ideal for running a jewelry business.

So, how can you make sure your production and marketing align better? Stay tuned for some advice.

Check out the transcript below.

Laryssa Wirstiuk
Ready to break free from algorithms, vanity PR, and money-sucking ads? My name’s Laryssa Wirstiuk, and I’ve learned in 7 years of jewelry marketing that content is the crown jewel. My agency Joy Joya takes a holistic approach, leading with laser-focused storytelling, impactful content creation, and strategic content distribution. This method has worked for the solopreneur as well as the multi-million-dollar company, and now I’m sharing these systems and tactics with you. Here’s to standing out in the Sea of Sparkle.

Welcome to Episode #278. Today, I’d like to discuss a common challenge many jewelry business owners face when it comes to planning their marketing content. Surprisingly, it’s not about their marketing skills or knowledge, but rather about production; yes, about the actual designing and making of their products. When we help our clients organize their content calendars, typically looking six months ahead, we sometimes hit a roadblock: not knowing the production schedule. Together, between us and the business owner, we have no shortage of good and interesting ideas. But if the production calendar hasn’t been fleshed out, we can’t plan marketing effectively. I understand that production can be complicated, especially if you’re not making everything yourself. Even if you are, relying on suppliers and delivery times can be tricky. But even business owners who handle everything sometimes struggle to plan ahead because they prioritize creativity over sticking to a schedule. While being creative is amazing and important, it’s important to realize that running a solid business powered by effective marketing needs some insight into production. Without it, planning can really become chaotic, which isn’t ideal for running a jewelry business. So, how can you make sure your production and marketing align better? Stay tuned for some advice.

But before we get to the solid gold, I’d like to take a moment to remind you that this podcast has both audio and video – so you can either listen on your favorite podcast platform or watch on YouTube by searching “Joy Joya”. You can support the podcast for free by taking the time not only to subscribe but also to leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. I’m also so thrilled to announce that the recipients of the Joy Joya “Name Your Price” Jewelry Brand Incubator have been chosen. Congrats to the following emerging brands, which will be working for us for the next six months: Jennifer DeMoro Jewelry, Junebug Jewelry Designs, Olaeda, Geralyn Sheridan Designs, Lori Francescutti, and Fenomena. I’m hoping to get some of these talented business owners on the podcast so stay tuned! And I’m hoping to get some of these talented business owners on the podcast. So stay tuned for that.

Okay, let’s get into today’s episode, my Sparklers! This one’s all about why your production calendar and your marketing calendar need to be aligned and how to get both those calendars on the same page for optimal results. First off, let’s define what a production calendar or schedule means for a jewelry business. Essentially, even the smallest jewelry businesses operate similarly to manufacturing companies because they create products for their customers. To successfully manage this process, they need a detailed plan that outlines how to produce their goods. For small businesses, this could be as simple as using a spreadsheet or another manual method to keep track of their production activities. It’s important to have a system in place to monitor both upcoming and current product lines or collections. Why is it crucial to know your production calendar beforehand? Planning equals success, as you’ve likely gathered from this podcast. A solid plan gives you the time to prepare and set yourself up for success, instead of scrambling at the last minute. While there’s room in the marketing calendar for evergreen topics and existing inventory, relying solely on these isn’t sufficient. Customers crave novelty occasionally, and it’s up to you to provide it. But to do so effectively, you need an idea of when new products will be available and what they’ll entail.

However, it’s surprising how many brands lack this insight until the eleventh hour, resulting in compromised marketing efforts. The main challenge? Without visibility into production schedules, we miss out on capitalizing on seasonal trends and timely events. For instance, not knowing when certain pieces will be ready can cause us to miss opportunities to launch them during peak demand periods, like holidays or special occasions. Moreover, without awareness of arrival times, we can’t properly build anticipation through teasers or provide sufficient lead time for promotions. Ideally, major product releases should anchor the marketing calendar, with other activities structured around them. Unfortunately, this isn’t always the case. Additionally, if you’re offering made-to-order items with lengthy lead times, it’s essential to consider how this affects your promotional timing, especially if you’re aiming for specific occasions or seasons. Challenges and Solutions As mentioned earlier, I’m well aware of the hurdles that come with production. Almost every jewelry brand I’ve collaborated with has faced delays and changes in timelines, not just in production but also in other aspects like product photography and listing creation for ecommerce sites. However, it’s crucial to work towards streamlining this process over time, aiming for greater accuracy in predicting timelines for customers. How do we achieve this? By continuously refining our prediction-making skills regarding production. Even if all the pieces aren’t in place yet, it’s beneficial to outline concepts for future products and collections. Remember, it’s okay if things aren’t set in stone, especially if rigid planning stifles your creativity. However, having some foresight into what’s on the horizon and being able to integrate that into your marketing efforts will help build excitement both internally and among your customers at the right moment.

How to Align Production and Marketing Create a Detailed Production Schedule that outlines your production process, regardless of the product or collection. Develop a comprehensive production schedule that outlines timelines for each stage of the manufacturing process, from design to final product. Include buffer times to account for unexpected delays and ensure realistic expectations. Where are the places that typically hold you up or keep you from having full clarity? Is there anything you can do to take away some of that mystery and have clearer ideas about when a product would be released? Does this production schedule change based on the type of product you’re producing? How often do you want to be releasing new products? For some brands that I work with, the customers respond really well to newness. They constantly want releases of new products, and they thrive on novelty. For other brands, the customers don’t necessarily want new things all the time. Instead, they like to learn more about the current products and dive into the in-depth stories about the pieces. Or maybe they like the current design offerings but occasionally like to see a limited-edition color or gemstone. You really need to know your customers, and what they’d like from you.

Commit to a regular launch schedule that makes sense not only for your realistic production expectations but also for your customers. If it helps you flesh out the marketing calendar, commit to an actual day every month or every quarter or whenever that is to launch a new product or collection. But that is not only on your production calendar but also on your marketing calendar. Plan for a buffer around that spot on your marketing calendar. If you know that production can vary by 2-3 weeks of your target, then you’ll need to have backup content to pad the weeks around when you may be launching a product. You’ll also need to have more frequent check-ins with the marketing calendar and treat it as a more dynamic, living breathing thing. Less visibility into your production will mean you’ll need to keep even closer tabs on marketing to ensure that you’re not missing opportunities or dropping the ball on other items you could be promoting.

Thinking ahead of the launch, Integrate Marketing into the Production Process: Involve marketing early in the production process to align product development with marketing strategies. This collaboration can help tailor products to meet customer needs and preferences, ultimately enhancing their marketability. It can also help tell the story throughout production and help tease the products. Rather than taking the approach that you will let marketing fly by the seat of the pants of production, err on the side of trying to plan your marketing schedule and then remain flexible and adaptable to changes in market conditions and consumer preferences. Continuously monitor feedback and performance metrics to adjust production and marketing strategies accordingly, ensuring agility in response to evolving trends and demands. Above all, when creating a production schedule, it’s essential to be realistic more than optimistic. Avoid overloading your production schedule and setting unrealistic deadlines for production as well as marketing. Wishful thinking in production will lead to many changes that will need to be made to the marketing calendar, and it’s better to save yourself all those steps of revisions and erring on the side of being more realistic.

So what do you think about that? Do you kind of struggle with the production calendar and you do feel like that’s holding you back in your marketing I would love to know if you try some of these tips are even try to audit your production production schedule and see if that helps you better promote and launch your products. Okay, let’s get into the GOLD MINE.

Welcome to another edition of THE GOLD MINE – a segment where I get personal and share insights on entrepreneurship, mindset, success, growth, and all things business. THE GOLD MINE allows me to share topics and insights close to my heart. On this week’s GOLD MINE, I want to talk about a saying my mom used to tell me when I was a teen, younger adult, and it’s been popping into my head lately. I like it and want to share it with you! So my mom used to say, “Get their monkeys off your back.” I think I’ve mentioned in this podcast before that I’m the kind of person who gives other people the benefit of the doubt, and so I absorb a lot of problems that probably shouldn’t be my problems. So I have to often remind myself to “get their monkey off my back.” Basically, if you’re not familiar with the phrase, it refers to the fact that a lot of people in the world have trouble taking accountability and responsibility for their own issues, so they often look for someone else to blame or to take on their problems and workload. This happens in business a lot, mostly because most people in the working world are overwhelmed and tired and sometimes it’s just easier for them to try to pass on their burden and gripes to you. So saying “get their monkeys off your back” suggests finding a way to prevent or stop taking on these burdens unnecessarily, encouraging individuals to manage their own tasks and responsibilities rather than passing them onto others. This concept is often discussed in management and personal productivity contexts to emphasize the importance of boundary-setting and effective delegation. And then if you’re the kind of person who gives other people the benefit of the doubt, you’re likely taking on a lot of monkeys. If you’re someone who has trouble saying “no”, then you’re probably also a person who’s prone to monkeys. In business and in life, most relationships are two-way streets, meaning that no one thing is rarely fully anyone’s fault or problem. If you’re working with vendors, have employees, have customers, there is a mutual relationship there. So if someone is trying to put a lot of things on you, take a moment to step back and ask what the other person is trying to avoid or not acknowledge. Here’s an example you might experience with a vendor: A vendor frequently misses delivery deadlines, causing the owner to constantly follow up and micromanage the vendor’s schedule to ensure inventory levels are maintained. A vendor requires constant reminders and negotiations for every order, rather than establishing a reliable and consistent ordering process. And yes, even customers themselves can be putting monkeys on your back, especially in a jewelry business where interactions are often personalized, and expectations for service and product quality are high. Customers might have expectations that are beyond what is standard for the business, such as demanding customizations that are not typically offered or expecting faster than usual turnaround times for repairs or orders. Some customers might frequently return items or lodge complaints about products or services, requiring the business owner’s direct intervention to resolve issues that could potentially be handled through standard customer service protocols. Those are just a couple of many potential examples. Having monkeys on your back may also mean that you’re not delegating effectively. For example, Managing every aspect of the business’s administration, such as scheduling, payroll, or accounting, without delegating or using software solutions to streamline these tasks. Personally handling all communication, from emails to phone calls, instead of setting up systems or delegating to staff. Taking on the full responsibility of managing the business’s social media accounts and marketing campaigns without seeking help from employees or hiring a marketing professional. What do you think? Do you have monkeys on your back that you need to remove? Drop me a message via Instagram DM, leave a review on the podcast, or comment on our YouTube channel. Let’s engage in a discussion about it!

Did you have any questions about today’s episode? You can always email me Laryssa at laryssa@joyjoya.com. If you loved this podcast, please share it with a friend who’d appreciate it. And don’t forget to subscribe as well as leave a review on Apple Podcasts. If you’re completely new to digital marketing, then you’ll want to purchase and read a copy of my book JEWELRY MARKETING JOY. Visit joyjoya.com/book for more information.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai